A (16) | B (1) | C (10) | D (4) | E (4) | F (5) | G (4) | H (1) | I (5) | J (1) | K (1) | L (5) | M (5) | N (2) | O (4) | P (11) | R (5) | S (9) | T (10) | V (1) | W (1) | Y (1)
Titlesort descending Definition
Abandonment

The failure of a parent to provide adequately for the financial support
for a child and an unjustified failure to maintain, or attempt to maintain,
contact or a parental relationship with the child. Abandonment is judged over a
period of time which varies in different states, but the time period to prove legal abandonment is usually between 6 months and one year.

Abuse

The use or treatment of someone or something that is seen as harmful. Abuse
of a person can be physical, sexual, emotional, verbal, or a combination of any or all of those. Abuse of a substance may involve alcohol or drugs.

ACSLA

(short for Ansell Casey Life skills
Assessment) An evaluation of young person's skills which will contribute to their success as
they transition to adulthood. Available for free at caseylifeskills.org.

ADD

(short for Attention Deficit Disorder) A medical condition that affects how well someone can sit still, focus, and
pay attention. People with ADHD have differences in the parts of their brains that
control attention and activity. This means that they may have trouble focusing on
certain tasks and subjects, or they may seem "wired," act impulsively, and get into trouble.

Addiction

When a person has no control over whether he or she uses drugs or alcohol.
For example, someone who's addicted to cocaine has grown so used to the drug that he or she has to have it. Addiction can be physical, psychological, or both.

ADHD

A medical condition that affects how well someone can sit still, focus, and
pay attention. People with ADHD have differences in the parts of their brains that
control attention and activity. This means that they may have trouble focusing on
certain tasks and subjects, or they may seem "wired," act impulsively, and get into
trouble.

Adjudication

A hearing to figure out if there has been a crime.

Adoption

The creation of a new, permanent relationship between an adoptive parent
and a child. Once this happens, there is no legal difference between a child who
is adopted and a child who is born into a family. Adoption can happen at any time,
from baby to teenager (or even beyond). Adoption can be by a relative, foster parent, or a completely new family. An adoptive family might be a single parent, a couple, or a family with kids.

Advocate

A person who speaks up on behalf of
themselves or someone else in an effort to
gain services or things.

Agency

The organization responsible for providing
services while a child or youth is in foster
care. Agencies may have names such as
CPS, DHS, or CFS and may be run by the
county, state or by a private organization.

Aging Out

When a youth emancipates or leaves foster
care because they turn a certain age, such
as 18 or 21 (depending on the laws of
the state they live in). Aging out usually
results in loss of support from the State
for things such as foster care payments,
housing, living costs and health services.

Ansell Casey Life Skills Assessment

An evaluation of young person's skills
which will contribute to their success as
they transition to adulthood. Available for
free at caseylifeskills.org.

Appeal

Someone asks for a hearing to change
the court's decision. Any court decision
is subject to an appeal. Appeals can take
several months to resolve.

Arraignment

The court gives an individual a chance to
admit or deny the crime or to let the judge
decide.

Attention Deficit Disorder

A medical condition that affects how
well someone can sit still, focus, and
pay attention. People with ADHD have
differences in the parts of their brains that
control attention and activity. This means
that they may have trouble focusing on
certain tasks and subjects, or they may
seem "wired," act impulsively, and get into
trouble.

Attorney

A professional person authorized to
practice law and give legal advice. Most
young people in foster care are represented
by an attorney in court, who helps to
protect their best interests. The agency,
biological parents, adoptive parents and
others involved in the case may have their
own attorney. Also called a lawyer.