Credit hours:
2.50

Course Summary

For a youth in foster care, the transition out of care to independence is often difficult, confusing and filled with uncertainty. Being informed and prepared can make a big difference. The FosterClub Transition Toolkit is designed to help teens understand what successful transitioning from foster care means to them, how to prepare ahead of time, the importance of staying on the right course, and what resources, as participants in the foster care system, are available to them. The FosterClub Transition Toolkit is a step by step way for youth aging out of care to develop a transition plan (required by federal law). The Toolkit includes planning worksheets, record keeping, detailed maps and resources on the ten different transition-planning topics.

In this course, you can expect to learn:

  • the role of youth engagement in transition planning
  • the Federal legal/legislative requirements for transition plans
  • what a transition plan should include
  • how to use the FosterClub Transition Toolkit

Step 1

Watch this video of FosterClub Board Member and alumna of foster care, Nicole Dobbins, discuss Transition & Youth Engagment:

Step 2

Review "Working With Youth to Develop a Transition Plan", provided by the Child Welfare Information Gateway.

Step 3

Review the FosterClub Transition Toolkit. The publication is designed to help foster youth develop a transition plan. As a foster parent, you can introduce a young person to this tool and help them complete it. 

Step 4

Join the discussion in the comments below to answer the following question:

What is your foster youth's main concern about leaving care?

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Course Discussion

KimberlyA's picture

KimberlyA said:

I have not had to go through this process yet since I have younger aged foster children. I would think thought that the fears are many, not least of which where they will live and how they will eat. I personally would not make a child leave just because they turned 18, I didn't with my own biological children.
Eddie.Hall's picture

Eddie.Hall said:

My foster child is worried abut making the wrong decisions because of so many influences.they have fears about being alone.
Eddie.Hall's picture

Eddie.Hall said:

We have adopted 3 kids and in the process of adopting another.I worry that they will go back to their old ways and something bad happening.I know they are safe as long as they are with us but when they leave that's when we start to worry.
jsduke's picture

jsduke said:

My foster children are not my adopted children, but I still worry that they will get lost along the way as they get older. I hope they know they have a supportive family and that we will always be here.
VickyR's picture

VickyR said:

My biggest fear is who will be there for my children when I no longer am.
dlhorner58's picture

dlhorner58 said:

our child has health concerns due to her being a diabetic. As an adult she won't have someone to guide her into making a good choice when it comes to her health
jesikad01's picture

jesikad01 said:

how will i earn enough money to support myself and child without a high school diploma.
GooberDad's picture

GooberDad said:

Our youths main concern is being pregnant and having no high school education completed.
1moswalt's picture

1moswalt said:

Our teenager in care had decided to stay in care when she turned 18. A month or so later, she started talking about signing herself out of care. We spent a lot of time talking to her about how she isn't quite prepared for the real world. She's a bit impulsive and hadn't thought things through. Fortunately, we were able to talk her out of it (no license, no car, no job is not a good predicament to start out with). This talk also motivated her to start getting things figured out. Within a month she had a job and a permit. And a couple months later a license and a car. Now she talks about going to college and we are helping guide her through the steps to make it happen. I'm not sure what her biggest fear of leaving care is, but we are gaining confidence that she has the potential to manage it if she will let us guide her a bit longer.
1voswalt's picture

1voswalt replied:

I couldn't tell you what her biggest fear is either. But, I am definitely proud of where she is, especially in comparison of where she was before coming to our home and even the first few months after she came to our home. She will be with us a year in November and my hopes for her have increased majorly. Personally, my biggest fear for her is her kind, giving heart and people taking advantage of her because of it. But, she definitely has the potential to be great!