Credit hours:
2.00

Course Summary

Welcome to a course designed to help foster parents and caregivers regarding permanency for foster youth. In this course you will learn that Permanency comes in many different shapes and sizes, and that different people can provide different types of permanency for foster youth. We believe permanence is vital to a foster youth’s success in life, therefore we plan on expanding on this topic with future courses.

In this course, you can expect to learn:

  • The federal definition of permanency
  • Statistics for permanency outcomes
  • Your role in helping children establish permanence
  • Youth perspective about permanence and build skills to speak to youth about permanence

Step 1

Read this FosterClub Real Story written by Aaron Weaver explaining how achieving permanency can make a significant contribution to a young person’s time spent in care.

Step 2

Read "Permanency: More Than Just Homes". The article was written for CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) volunteers, but contains relevant and valuable information for foster parents and caregivers

Step 3

Read pages 1-5 of "Court Hearings for the Permanent Placement of Children" from the Child Welfare Information Gateway.

Step 4

Review the National Foster Youth Advisory Council's (NFYAC), a group of young leaders who have experienced foster care, top ten recommendations for Ensuring Permanency for Youth in the Foster Care.

Step 5

Young people have a need for permanence even after they leave foster care. Read "You don't age out of family", a blog written by Julia Charles, a #FosterClubLeader.

Step 6

Join the discussion in the comments below to answer the following question:

Do you think foster parents need to pay most attention to the federal definition of permanency or the youths' definition? Why?

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Course Discussion

mwilson518's picture

mwilson518 said:

I think both are equally important. The federal definition and guidelines help provide a framework for taking children who have experienced relational trauma to recover and get settled into as "normal" and stable a family life as possible...but the children involved also have a voice and must be heard and taken seriously.
Mtic1977's picture

Mtic1977 said:

I think both parties definitions of permanency are important but ultimately the child's definition to me means mote because they are the one's who have to deal with it the most
Mtic1977's picture

Mtic1977 said:

I think both parties definitions of permanency are important but ultimately the child's definition to me means mote because they are the one's who have to deal with it the most
cgoslee's picture

cgoslee said:

I think both are important. The federal is going to cover all aspects and the youth is speaking from the real experience which is very important as well..
cgoslee's picture

cgoslee said:

I think both are important. The federal is going to cover all aspects and the youth is speaking from the real experience which is very important as well..
kdavis5916's picture

kdavis5916 said:

I think both Federal and Youth are important but I think the that needs to be primary depends on the age.
kdavis5916's picture

kdavis5916 said:

I think both are important eas a guideline to start. I think that it depends on the age of the child. For older youth in the system, their voices need to heard. For the babies and younger youth I think we foster parents need more of a voice. We are the ones caring for these children on a daily basis. We hear and see more than any case worker, GAL, CASA worker and judge. We don't have a voice and I think that is something that needs to be addressed ASAP.
aweaver's picture

aweaver said:

Both the federal and foster care youth's definitions of permanency are important. It is helpful to have the federal definition in mind while discussing permanency with a foster care youth, in case they have never thought about permanency or how to obtain it in his/her own life. Listening to foster care youth is vital to their growth, development, and sense of self-worth.
jimrudd1961's picture

jimrudd1961 said:

both are important , the law sets a guideline for us to follow but the youth def. must be respected and taken into consideration.
mrskmhooker's picture

mrskmhooker said:

I think foster parents need to pay more attention to the youth as they are the voice and ones needing permanency. Federal regulations are important but it doesn't always mean they know whats best, but the child is the one whos life is being affected.