Credit hours:
2.50

Course Summary

For teenagers who have been living in foster care, the transition to adulthood presents many new and often daunting experiences. This course provides foster parents with guidance on how to help youth and emerging adults build a foundation for a successful transition to adult life outside of foster care.

In this course, you can expect to learn:

  • Unique challenges youth face when exiting foster care
  • Adolescent development and changes in the brain
  • Laws and programs to support transitioning youth
  • The critical role of foster parents
  • Tools to empower foster youth to prepare for the transition to adulthood

Step 1

Read this FosterClub Real Story written by Shawn Denise Semelsberger. She provides youth perspective about aging out of foster care unprepared.

Step 2

FosterClub recommends foster youth do 21 things before they transition out of care to make sure they have a successful journey to independence. Read FosterClub's "it's T time" to become familiar with steps foster youth should take before they leave foster care.

Step 3

Read this FosterClub Real Story written by Ricky Ballesteros, he provides valuable youth perspective about why transition planning is important.

Step 4

Review "Helping Youth Transition to Adulthood: Guidance for Foster Parents", developed by the Child Welfare Information Gateway.

Step 5

Join the discussion in the comments below to answer the following question:

When do you think a young person should begin their transition plan?

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Course Discussion

covertmelanie's picture

covertmelanie said:

While I think its great that children are assisted with coming up with their transition plan, 90 days seems like a short time frame. I think youth should begin to work on their transition plan around the age of 17, this gives them a year to plan to reconsider and to begin taking over minor responsibilities for themselves.
Ratworld3's picture

Ratworld3 said:

children should be learning important independent life skills throughout their life. simple finance can be taught at a very early age with allowance.
MCSemones's picture

MCSemones said:

The transition plan should probably phase in early high school; life skills should be taught as soon as developmentally appropriate for each kid's situation, and built into their day-to-day life to give them time to learn, practice, make mistakes, and grow successfully.
Rena C. Shook's picture

Rena C. Shook said:

I think someone should fix the bugs in this course! I click on the stories and I get a grey blob saying what we are about, Frustrating! I have been a member before and someone changed it! Not for the better!
Lamedin's picture

Lamedin said:

Depending on the youths maturity, transition should be started as soon as reasonably possible. The sooner the teen gets the necessities of life in place the easier it will be for them to make a smoother move into the adult world. It is our job to be supportive and helpful during these times and provide as much insight and resources as possible.
requiempress@gmail.com's picture

requiempress@gm... said:

At least 90 days, but ideally each day should be a preparation.
brookiedee's picture

brookiedee said:

Youth should begin their transition plan when they are in high school. I remember having an afterschool job, opening a checking account and buying things for myself. If I had not learned these things in high school I would not have transition into adulthood easily. I was not raised in foster care but I experienced some of the same challenges teenagers do after I moved out of my home at the age of 18. Having a strong adult support team was also beneficial to transitioning to independence.
ericjo50's picture

ericjo50 said:

I think youth need to start thinking about a transition plan in the early years of high school. They may change their minds many times so starting early will benefit them.
jmangen1974's picture

jmangen1974 said:

I think the latest a child should start their transition plan is the beginning of high school. They should start thinking about what it is they want to do after high school and plan their school schedule accordingly. Maybe even think about going to a vocational school with a work program.
Jbrundage2678's picture

Jbrundage2678 said:

I feel as though children should be taught these responsibilities as soon as they show signs of understanding money. Whether it be from an allowance or money received by other means. A child in care should be offered life skills by the state as part of their times in care. This would help foster parents refine thier general skill set.