Credit hours:
3.00

Course Summary

A young person's care and development, in foster care, should be the top concern of all supportive adults involved. Foster parents may need to take unique steps to ensure the young person's maximum well-being if the child's cultural background is different than their own. This means a thorough respect and understanding of the young person's religion, cultural values, customs, and beliefs. As outlined in the following course, cultural sensitivity can give a young person a sense of permanency and belonging that will benefit them in emotional, mental and spiritual ways.

In this course, you can expect to learn:

  • Things to take into consideration before committing to becoming a parent to a young person of a different race
  • How to help foster youth gain a strong sense of racial identity
  • How important cultural connections are for foster youth How to help minimize the impact of being placed in a home with a very different culture
  • How to help make your home a bicultural home How to celebrate a bicultural family
Transracial Parenting in Foster Care and Adoption

Step 1

Review the  "Transracial Parenting in Foster Care and Adoption" guidebook created to help parents and children in transracial homes learn how to thrive in and celebrate their bicultural family; and for children to gain a strong sense of racial identity and cultural connections.

Step 2

Watch the following video to gain perspective of the impact living in a home outside of their own culture or ethnic background has on a young person in foster care 

Step 3

Review this booklet created by C. Kimo Alameda, Ph. D,  "In the Rainbow: Cultural Best Practices in Foster Care" to learn how Hawai'i, the country's most diverse state, is being mindful of the trauma youth have experienced coming into the foster care system and how to minimize the impact of being placed in a home with a very different culture.

Step 4

Join the discussion in the comments below to answer the following question:

What challenges have you faced, or what challenges are you fearful of facing, as a bicultural foster parent?

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Course Discussion

shannonk's picture

shannonk said:

How will I know when is the right time to start discussions with my son about his African-American culture and introduce him to experiences that will help strengthen his cultural identity?
mistydlance's picture

mistydlance said:

As she matures, will she feel comfortable telling me if she feels her cultural needs are not being met?
Adream706's picture

Adream706 said:

I have seen parents foster other races and as long as the environment was nurturing the children thrived
Adream706's picture

Adream706 said:

I have seen parents foster other races and as long as the environment was nurturing the children thrived
dtcohens's picture

dtcohens said:

Fostering bicultural children sometimes when they have a family outing enjoy family traditions they can rebel. Different religions and spiritual beliefs.
dtcohens's picture

dtcohens said:

I feel being a bicultural foster parent my children show distance. I show love, I care about them, I involved in their life and very giving. I've kept them with their cultural and social involvement. I known I'm making a different in there live being positive not giving up on them. Providing a stable and peremant home for my bicultural children.